Dying to Ride holds its annual memorial ride for fallen riders
on the second Saturday of June of each year followed by a
night of camping, food and music.

You can add the name of the loved one you've lost in a
motorcycle collision by adding their name and the year
of your loss to our guestbook.

Join DTR and help us promote motorcycle awareness.
The life you save could be someone close to you.

 












 

WORLD MOTORCYCLE FATALITIES STATISTICS

Statistics for Motorcycle Riders
(Links on the bottom of page for more stats)


Per vehicle mile travelled, motorcyclists' risk of a fatal crash is 35 times greater than a passenger car

 According to the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), in 2006, 13.10 cars out of 100,000 ended up in fatal crashes. The rate for motorcycles is 72.34 per 100,000 registered motorcycles.[1] Motorcycles also have a higher fatality rate per unit of distance travelled when compared with automobiles.

In 2004, figures from the UKDepartment for Transport indicated that motorcycles have 16 times the rate of serious injuries per 100 million vehicle kilometers compared to cars, and double the rate of bicycles.

A national study by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATS) found that:

            Motorcycle rider death rates increased among all rider age groups between 1998 and 2000    

      Motorcycle rider deaths were nearly 30 times more than drivers of other vehicles

            Motorcycle riders aged below 40 are 36 times more likely to be killed than other vehicle operators of   the same age.

            Motorcycle riders aged 40 years and over are around 20 times more likely to be killed than other drivers of that same age.

 Additional data from the United States reveals that there are over four million motorcycles registered in the United States. Motorcycle fatalities represent approximately five percent of all highway fatalities each year, yet motorcycles represent just two percent of all registered vehicles in the United States.

Approximately 80 percent of reported motorcycle crashes result in injury or death; a comparable figure for automobiles is about 20 percent

 


 

 

The Hurt Report
 

§                    75% of accidents were found to involve a motorcycle and a passenger vehicle, while the remaining 25% of accidents were single motorcycle accidents.

§                    "In the single vehicle accidents, motorcycle rider error was present as the accident precipitating factor in about two-thirds of the cases, with the typical error being a slide-out and fall due to overbraking or running wide on a curve due to excess speed or under-cornering."

§                    "Almost half of the fatal accidents show alcohol involvement" and "injury severity increases with speed, alcohol involvement and motorcycle size."

§                    In the multiple vehicle accidents, the driver of the other vehicle violated the motorcycle right-of-way and caused the accident in two-thirds of those accidents.

§                    The report's additional findings show that the wearing of appropriate gear, specifically, helmets and durable garment, mitigates crash injuries substantially.

§                    "Vehicle failure accounted for less than 3% of these motorcycle accidents, and most of those were single vehicle accidents where control was lost due to a puncture flat" and "Weather is not a factor in 98% of motorcycle accidents."

§                    "The failure of motorists to detect and recognize motorcycles in traffic is the predominating cause of motorcycle accidents...Conspicuity of the motorcycle is a critical factor in the multiple vehicle accidents, and accident involvement is significantly reduced by the use of motorcycle headlamps-on In daylight and the wearing of high visibility yellow, orange or bright red jackets."


 




MAIDS Report
Main article: MAIDS report

 

 

The most recent large-scale study of motorcycle accidents is the MAIDS report carried out in five European countries in 1999 to 2000, using the rigorous OECD standards, including a statistically significant sample size of over 900 crash incidents and over 900 controlcases.

The MAIDS report tends to support most of the Hurt Report findings, for example that "69% of the OV [other vehicle] drivers attempted no collision avoidance manoeuvre," suggesting they did not see the motorcycle. And further that, "the largest number of PTW [powered two-wheeler] accidents is due to a perception failure on the part of the OV driver or the PTW rider." And "The data indicates that in 68.7% of all cases, the helmet was capable of preventing or reducing the head injury sustained by the rider (i.e., 33.2% + 35.5%). In 3.6% of all cases, the helmet was found to have no effect upon head injury" and "There were no reported cases in which the helmet was identified as the contact code for a serious or maximum neck injury.

 


 

 Inconclusive Findings on Conspicuity

A New Zealand study using data taken between 1993-96 in the city of Auckland, a "predominantly urban area" (Wells et al.[11] ) supported the Hurt Report's call for increased rider conspicuity, claiming that riders wearing white or light colored helmets, fluorescent or reflective clothing or using daytime headlights were under-represented when compared to a group of motorcycle accident victims. The accident victims were those who were killed, or admitted or treated at hospital "with an injury severity score >5 within 24 hours of a motorcycle crash". Accidents that did not result in hospitalization or treatment for a critical injury, or a death were not considered, nor was there any consideration of involvement of other road users, or culpability. The definition of reflective or fluorescent clothing was taken to include "clothing or other articles such as a jacket, vest, apron, sash, ankle or wrist band, or back pack including stripes, decals or strips". No assessment of the type (open or full-face) of helmet was undertaken. Most of the crashes took place in "urban 50km/h speed limit zones (66%), during the day (64%) and in fine weather (72%)". No association was observed between risk of crash related injury and the frontal colour of the drivers' (sic) clothing or motorcycle.

The MAIDS report did not publish information on helmet color or the prevalence of reflective or fluorescent clothing in either the accident or control groups, or the use of lights in the control group, and therefore drew no statistical conclusions on their effectiveness, neither confirming nor refuting the claims of the Wells report. In each MAIDS case, the clothing worn by the rider was photographed and evaluated.

MAIDS found that motorcycles painted white were actually over-represented in the accident sample compared to the exposure data.[12]On clothing, MAIDS used a "purely subjective" determination of if and how the clothing worn probably affected conspicuity in the accident. The report concluded that "in 65.3% of all cases, the clothing made no contribution to the conspicuity of the rider or the PTW [powered two-wheeler, i.e. motorcycle]. There were very few cases found in which the bright clothing of the PTW rider enhanced the PTW’s overall conspicuity (46 cases). There were more cases in which the use of dark clothing decreased the conspicuity of the rider and the PTW (120 cases)." MAIDs concluded that in one case dark clothing actually increased conspicuity but reported none where bright clothing decreased it.[13]

 




Motorcycle Deaths and Veterans

Growing data shows that an alarming number of veterans returning from combat areas such as Iraq and Afghanistan are dying in motorcycle related fatalities. Between October 2007 and October 2008, 24 active-duty Marines died from motorcycle accidents. There were 4,810 deaths on motorcycles in the U.S. in 2006, an increase of 5 percent over the previous year, and more than double (2,161) over the decade before, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). In the Marine Corps, high-speed bikes account for the majority of fatalities. In 2007, 78 percent of motorcycle mishaps in the Marines occurred on a sport bike, compared to 38 percent nationally

 


 

Consequences of Accidents

A motorcyclist unbuckles his chin strap in order to remove his helmet after sustaining a minor hand injury through losing control on a wet corner.

Once the collision has occurred, or the rider has lost control through some other mishap, several common types of injury occur when the bike falls:

Collision with less forgiving protective barriers or roadside "furniture" (lampposts, signs, fences, etc...). Note that when one falls off a motorcycle in the middle of a curve, lamps and signs become impossible to negotiate around.

Concussion and brain damage, as the head violently contacts other vehicles or objects. Riders wearing an approved helmet reduce the risk of death by 37 percent.[31]Breakage of joints (elbows, shoulders, hips, knees and wrists), fingers, spine and neck, for the same reason. The most common breakages are the shoulder and the pelvis.

Soft tissue (skin and muscle) damage (road rash) as the body slides across the surface. This can be prevented entirely with the proper use of motorcycle-specific protective apparel such as a leather jacket or reinforced denim and textile pants.

There is also a condition known as biker's arm, where the nerves in the upper arm are damaged during the fall, causing a permanent paralysis of arm movement.

Facial disfigurement, if in the absence of a full-face helmet, the unprotected face slides across the ground or smashes into an object. Thirty-five percent of all crashes show major impact on the chin-bar area.[32]



The Hurt Report also commented on injuries after an accident stating that the likelihood of injury is extremely high in these motorcycle accidents - 98% of the multiple vehicle collisions and 96% of the single vehicle accidents resulted in some kind of injury to the motorcycle rider; 45% resulted in more than a minor injury.

 



List of motorcycle deaths in U.S. by year

Annual U.S. motorcycle deaths

Year

Deaths

1994

2,320

1995

2,227

1996

2,161

1997

2,116

1998

2,294

1999

2,483

2000

2,897

2001

3,197†

2002

3,244

2003

3,661‡

2004

4,028

2005

4,576

2006

4,837

2007

5,174

2008

5,312

2009

4,462

2010

3,615

† some NHTSA lists show 3,181
‡ some NHTSA lists show 3,714

This is a list of motorcycle deaths in U.S. by year from 1994 to 2010. United States motorcycle fatalities increased every year for 11 years since reaching a historic low of 2,116 fatalities in 1997, until a decline in 2009. In nine years, motorcycle deaths have more than doubled.

Since 1980, motorcycle ownership among riders aged 40 and over has increased dramatically, from 15.1 percent of all riders in 1980 to 43.7 percent in 1998. The mean engine displacement of the motorcycles involved in fatal crashes has also increased, from an average engine size of 769 cc (46.9 cu in) in 1990, to 959 cc (58.5 cu in) in 2001, an increase of 24.7 percent. This combination of older riders on higher-powered motorcycles may be partially responsible for the increase in motorcycle deaths from the late 1990s until 2004.

Half of motorcycle fatalities in single vehicle crashes relate to problems negotiating a curve prior to a crash—almost 60 percent of motorcyclist fatalities in single vehicle crashes occur at night.

In 2009, motorcycle fatalities in the US declined for the first time in 11 years. The yearly total dropped from 5,312 to 4,462. Automobile fatalities continued to decline for the seventh straight year. A decline in recreational motorcycling due to the late-2000s recession
 might account for the decrease in accidents, according to the authors of a report by the Governors Highway Safety Association, but a State motorcyclists' rights organization, the Motorcycle Riders Foundation, said motorcycle use appears to have increased, influenced by motorcycles' better fuel economy

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

GLOBAL MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENT STATISTICS

U.S. & CANADA

WORLD

U.S. ROAD DEATH MAP
TAC ROAD SAFETY
U.S. MOTORCYCLE FATALITIES BY STATE

ONTARIO MINISTRY OF TRANSPORTATION
NOVA SCOTIA MOTORCYCLE DEATH STATS
CANADIAN TRAFFIC VEHICLE STATS
ROAD SAFTY STATS JAPAN
MOTORCYCLE ACCICENTS CAUSES AND FACTORS
CALIFORNIA MOTORCYCLE STATISTICS 1970-2009
MOTORCYCLE SALES STATISTICS
MOTORCYCLE THEFTS IN THE US

 

UK ROAD DEATH MAP
UK BIKE ACCIDENT STATISTICS

UK DEPT FOR TRANSPORT IN DEPTH STUDY
NEW ZEALAND MOTORCYCLE CRASH SHEET

NEW SOUTH WALES MOTORCYCLE STATS
EUROPE TRAFFIC STATS
SOUTH AFRICA MOTORCYCLE STATS
CALCULATING LIVES SAVED BY HELMETS
INTERESTING MOTORCYCLE STATISTICS
UK MOTORCYCLE THEFT STATISTICS

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